three PharmD students posing outside TUC building

PharmD

New world, new approach. The world of pharmacy is built on innovation and so is Touro's unique PharmD program.

Our unique program integrates medications, disease states, science, and skills while personalizing your education through elective course offerings. An integrated curriculum promotes study across subjects and disciplines emphasizing unifying content. Student making meaningful connections through problem solving, active learning, and skill building leading naturally into real-life pharmacy practice experiences.

Our "PharmD in 3" Offers

  • Integrated courses based on ‘organ systems’ that are offered in block format so that you learn everything about medications, disease states, and science one system at a time.
  • Designated assessment and, when needed, re-assessment, to ensure all students have the chance to achieve mastery of course materials.
  • Classroom and rotation-based electives designed to help students individualize their curriculum for their needs and interests.
  • Offering certificates and microcredentials that help students stand out when it comes time to look for a residency or employment as a pharmacist.
  • Streamlined lecture/discussion topics to decrease repetitive content.
  • Increased skills development built into the curriculum to help make students practice ready.
  • 300 hours of introductory practice hours built into the curriculum’s schedule.
  • Eight 6-week advanced practice rotations, (a full third MORE than required by accreditation standards, and that most other schools offer) to maximize hands-on training.
  • Graduate 1 year earlier than most programs so you can practice as a pharmacist sooner.

What You'll Learn

Our PharmD didactic program uses an extended 19-week semester. More time = more learning and deeper understanding. Our experiential program is divided into two parts, each with increasing levels of responsibility and clinical maturity.

Pharmacists today have more clinical responsibilities and involvement in patient care. That’s why extended clinical training is important. In our 3-year program, you’ll engage in 8 advanced practice experiences (more than the 7 most programs offer).

Our graduates are critical thinkers able to meet the increasing expectations of the workplace.

Program Highlights

In Touro University California’s Doctor of Pharmacy program, you will:

  • Collaborate with fellow health professions students to serve the community in our Student-Run Free Clinic, Mobile Diabetes Education Center, Vaccination Programs and more.
  • Learn in a student-centered, interactive learning environment that is cooperative rather than competitive.
  • Develop technical and professional skills in our JV Long Foundation Pharmacy Practice Center.
  • Get more classroom and clinic experience for less than the average PharmD tuition in Northern California.
  • Obtain outstanding professional and personal development opportunities to develop your fullest potential.
  • Become a practice-ready graduate who is in high demand by employers.
  • Benefit from our commitment to serving a diverse student body and patient population.

The 2023-24 tuition will be $67,440.

Didactic Curriculum For Currently Enrolled Students: PharmD Year 1 and 2

Years 1 and 2 (P1 and P2) of the PharmD program focus on developing a strong foundational knowledge base. Classroom study is complemented by activities emphasizing synthesis of information & team building, technical and professional skills in a simulated pharmacy practice environment and introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPE).

There is a set sequence of topics covered in the first and second years of the curriculum. Each year‘s fall and spring semester is divided into three 5-week-long blocks that focus on a particular organ system. During the 6th week of each block, a formative-style examination is given in each track. The 19th week of each semester assesses all material covered during the semester. The comprehensive assessment is a three-part examination referred to as the Triple-Jump Exam (TJE).

Fall Year 1

PRMC 603 – Social, Administrative Sciences 1

(4 units) This 4-unit course familiarizes students with the various forces that shape the delivery of health care, specifically pharmaceutical care, as well as patient behavior. The course addresses the patchwork of systems and programs that feed into the larger health care system and delves particularly into underserved, or at-risk populations by discussing the resources available to them and how pharmacists can address issues related to health disparities and health illiteracy in providing culturally competent care. This course provides an introduction to pharmacy law, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Patient Safety and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), the California Business & Professions Code and the California Code of regulations.

PRMC 604 – Clinical Sciences 1

(4 units) This 4-unit course introduces pharmacy students to clinical lab medicine, immunizations and drug information. The pharmacist’s role in the management of patients with conditions affecting the musculoskeletal and dermatological systems is addressed. Students also work collaboratively in assigned groups to deliver a presentation on an over-the-counter (OTC) topic and learn how to write a clinical progress/SOAP note.

PRMC 620 – Intro Pharm Practice Experiences 1

(1.5 units) Student pharmacists gain initial and progressive pharmacy practice skills through Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE), which include 1) simulations, active learning, discussions and lectures in the Pharmacy Practice Center and 2) Real Practice Experiences that involve direct contact with patients and healthcare providers within the Community Practice setting.

PRMC 626A – Cross-track Application

(0.5 units) In this 0.5 credit hour course, the use of patient cases and practice problem sets aligned with materials presented in PRMC 601, 602 and 604 allows students to reinforce foundational knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology and therapeutics. Through introductory online modules, students are also introduced to inter-professional education (IPE). By engaging in various IPE activities pharmacy students interact, communicate and work as a team with students from public health, physician assistant, nursing, education and osteopathic medicine programs to ultimately enhance the quality of care of the patients they will serve.

Spring Year 1

PRMC 605– Biological Sciences 2

(5 units) This 5-unit course addresses human physiology and common forms of pathophysiology. It provides the foundational knowledge and critical thinking skills needed for competency in other biological, pharmaceutical and clinical sciences courses. Topic areas covered in this course include the normal physiology and pathophysiology of the following organ systems: respiratory, gastrointestinal, and liver (Block A); renal, ear/nose/throat (ENT), and ocular (Block B); and cardiovascular (Blocks B and C). Acute and chronic diseases in these organ systems will be discussed in regard to their pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical signs and symptoms, testing and diagnoses as well as the scientific basis for treatment and prevention. A combination of didactic lectures and active problem-based learning will be used to reinforce the material.

PRMC 606– Pharmaceutical Sciences 2

(5 units) This 5-unit course is the second didactic course in Pharmaceutical Sciences. It continues the discussion began in PRMC 602 of the principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmaceutics, with emphasis on how these principles apply to pharmacy practice. Students carry out out-of-class review and preparation, in-class active participation, small-group activities and participation in a group poster project in this course. Topics include pharmaceutical calculations, injectable medication, dosage and delivery forms, physical pharmacy principles, and pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of drugs acting on the respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular systems, and the eyes, ears, nose and throat (EENT).

PRMC 607– Social, Administrative Sciences 2

(4 units) This 4-unit course is taught in three blocks that familiarize pharmacy students with the overall health care environment within which the practice of pharmacy takes place. This overview includes the social, governmental, cultural, legal, and health care structures that impact upon patients, their families, pharmacists and their colleagues. Lectures and classroom discussions provide interdisciplinary approaches to difficult political, social and economic issues that confront health practitioners and the public. The focus is on special issues that impact some, but not all, identifiable health care populations, federal and state-run health prescription health benefit plans and the administration and regulation of such. In addition issues of medication safety, regulatory compliance, evidence-based practice, quality control improvement and good financial stewardship to improve drug therapy outcomes. The law portion focuses on state and federal regulations governing controlled substances.

PRMC 608 – Clinical Sciences 2

(5 units) This 5-unit course, addresses the pharmacist’s role in the management of patients with conditions affecting: (1) respiratory and gastrointestinal; (2) liver and renal; (3) ophthalmic/otic/oral; and (4) cardiovascular. These are the same topics covered in PRMC 605 and PRMC 606, such that there is coordination in the presentation of information in the pathophysiology, pharmacology, medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry, and pharmacy practice tracks. This consistency of topics presented helps achieve reinforcement and enhance comprehension of the elements of practice and the larger overall concept of translational education from “bench to bedside.” Cases will be “SOAPed” (written up in terms of their Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan). Exercises are reinforced in small group discussion (SGD) activities, SGD Mega Case Days, and a Comprehensive Case Day.

PRMC 621 – Intro Pharm Practice Experiences 2

(1 unit) Student pharmacists gain initial and progressive pharmacy practice skills through Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE), which include 1) simulations, active learning, discussions and lectures in the Pharmacy Practice Center and 2) Real Practice Experiences that involve direct contact with patients and healthcare providers within the Community Practice setting.

PRMC 626B – Cross-track Application

(0.5 units) In this 0.5 credit hour course, the use of patient cases and practice problem sets aligned with materials presented in PRMC 605, 606 and 608 allows students to reinforce foundational knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology and therapeutics. By engaging in various campus inter-professional education activities pharmacy students will interact, communicate and work as a team with students from public health, physician assistant, nursing, education and osteopathic medicine programs to ultimately enhance the quality of care of the patients they will serve.

PRMC 624 - Community IPPE

(3 units) This core Experiential Education will serve as the introduction to the Community Practice in the Community Pharmacy environment.

Didactic Elective Requirement

Students must complete four didactic elective units before progressing to the third year. Elective course offerings may vary from year to year based on faculty availability, student interests, and addition of new courses that reflect program needs. Some courses we’ve offered include:

  • PRMC-630 - Acute Care
  • PRMC-639A/B - Contemporary Topics in Pharmacy Management
  • PRMC-638 - Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T)
  • PRMC-633A & B - Pharmacy Calculations
  • PRMC-632 - Residency & Post-Graduate Training Preparation

Student pharmacists are eligible to take some elective courses offered by other colleges (e.g. College of Medicine; Public Health Program of the College of Education and Health Sciences, listed as IPEC and OPCC courses). Examples of courses include:

  • OPCC-670 - Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Coaching
  • IPEC-673 - Functional Nutrition & Lifestyle Medicine
  • IPEC-692 - Global Wellness
  • IPEC-650 - LGBTQIA & Considerations in HealthCare
  • IPEC-690 - Pathways to Success

Unless otherwise stated, most didactic elective courses are 1 credit hour, with grading on a pass/fail basis.

Clinical Rotations For Currently Enrolled Students: PharmD Years 3 and 4

Years 3 and 4 (P3 and P4) of the PharmD program are devoted to clinical practice rotations. We have nearly 500 rotation options including required rotations, elective rotations and open periods.

The experiential program is divided into two parts, each of which has increasing levels of responsibility and clinical maturity:

  1. The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE)
  2. The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE)

Extended clinical training means TUC graduate pharmacists are prepared for increasing patient centered pharmacotherapeutic responsibilities. The Board requires a total of 1500 intern hours before graduates may sit for the pharmacist licensing exam; 900 hours must be acquired in a pharmacy and 600 hours of experience substantially related to the practice of pharmacy may be granted by the Board at their discretion.

A student licensed as an intern during the first year of pharmacy school may acquire all of the required hours through their experiences in the curriculum.

All of the IPPEs, plus the 6-week APPE rotations in Institutional, Ambulatory Care 1 and Ambulatory Care 2 may be counted towards the 600 hours substantially related to the practice of pharmacy (we use this category for ambulatory care because ambulatory care rotations are not based in a pharmacy, but a medical clinic).

The 6-week APPE Community 1, Community 2, Acute Care 1 and Acute Care 2 rotations may be applied towards the 900 hours of experience acquired in a pharmacy (these total 960 hours) and the students are required to have the site preceptor sign off on these hours. Any of the 4 elective rotations based in a pharmacy may also be counted towards the 900, although the minimum would have already been met.

Core/Required Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

PRMC 705 - Community Pharmacy Practice 2

(6 units) In this rotation, the student pharmacist will gain experience and confidence in a community pharmacy setting with emphasis patient care activities. They will also apply knowledge and skills learned during didactic courses.

PRMC 706 - Ambulatory Care 1

(6 units) In this rotation, the student pharmacist will gain experience and confidence in an ambulatory care clinic setting with emphasis on fundamental family medicine and chronic diseases. They will also apply knowledge and skills learned during didactic courses.

PRMC 707 - Ambulatory Care 2

(6 units) In this rotation, the student pharmacist will gain experience and confidence in an ambulatory care clinic setting with emphasis on advanced fundamental family medicine and chronic diseases. They will also apply knowledge and skills learned during didactic courses. A prerequisite for this course is PRMC 706 – Ambulatory Care 1.

PRMC 708 - Acute Care 1

(6 units) In this rotation, the student pharmacist will gain experience and confidence in an acute care hospital setting with emphasis on internal medicine and critical care. They will also apply knowledge and skills learned during didactic courses.

PRMC 709 - Acute Care 2

(6 units) In this rotation, the student pharmacist will gain experience and confidence in an acute care hospital setting with emphasis on advanced internal medicine and critical care. They will also apply knowledge and skills learned during didactic courses. A prerequisite for this course is PRMC 708 – Acute Care 1.

Year 3

PRMC 713A – APPE Professional Development

(0.5 units) Symposium of topics to enhance and promote the transition of a student pharmacist to a professional pharmacist.

PRMC 713B – APPE Professional Development

(0.5 units) Symposium of topics to enhance and promote the transition of a student pharmacist to a professional pharmacist.

PRMC 713C – APPE Professional Development

(0.5 units) Symposium of topics to enhance and promote the transition of a student pharmacist to a professional pharmacist.

Year 4

PRMC 714A – APPE Professional Development

(0.5 unit) Symposium of topics to enhance and promote the transition of a student pharmacist to a professional pharmacist .

PRMC 714B – APPE Professional Development

(0.5 units) Symposium of topics to enhance and promote the transition of a student pharmacist to a professional pharmacist.

PRMC 714C – APPE Professional Development

(0.5 units) Symposium of topics to enhance and promote the transition of a student pharmacist to a professional pharmacist.

Elective/Required Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Students must complete a total of four elective APPEs (6 units each). An updated listing of elective rotations is provided in E*Value.

Outcomes

Today there are more opportunities for pharmacists to work in diverse settings with an increasing scope of their practice. Our graduates work in hospitals, own their own pharmacies, and teach and conduct research, to name a few.

Accreditation & Outcomes

Demographics of the Class of 2021

  • Over 90% attended a university in California
  • 8% have master’s degree
  • Cumulative GPA of 3.19
  • Average age of 25
  • About 90% are bilingual