Physician Assistant speaking to patient

Academics

Double your degree. In Touro California's Joint MSPAS/MPH Program, you'll earn two master's degrees in 33 months.

We believe the two degrees integrate perfectly, providing you with the skills to assess and serve both individuals and the communities in which they live.

Public Health & Medicine Together

Understanding the intersectionality between where someone lives, their community, and their health is vital to providing culturally competent care. Touro California's one-of-a-kind joint MSPAS/MPH program views and teaches healthcare using a social justice framework and a public health lens to educate PAs who will provide culturally sensitive care and advocate for under-resourced communities - treating the person and the place they call home.

All MPH students complete a public health field study. Depending on your concentration, you may conduct research with a non-profit organization, work inside a correctional facility or hospital, or conduct field studies in places such as Bolivia, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Nepal, or Uganda.

Through your elective courses in the MPH Program, you have the opportunity to focus your degree in one of three concentrations:

Learn more about the MPH Core Curriculum & Culminating Experiences.

Our Joint Degree Program

two female PA students in white coats posing outside college building

Our MSPAS/MPH program combines intensive academic training with eight clinical rotations and one public health field study. Your PA education will prepare you to diagnose and treat medical problems, assist in surgery, and write prescriptions. At the same time, your public health education will prepare you to address health challenges at a societal level. As of 2023, our program is ranked #2 in California and #16 in the nation for PA Programs by US News 

Curriculum

Below you'll find the courses, and their descriptions, you'll be taking while in the program. You'll also find lots of important information in the student handbooks:

Semester I - Fall

PASC 601J Clinical Microbiology & Antimicrobial Pharmacology (1.5 Units)

This course sequences clinical microbiology with antimicrobial pharmacology. Students will learn habitat, pathogenesis, laboratory testing considerations and disease states for selected medically important microbes including HIV. For antimicrobial medications, students will learn the mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, side effects, bioavailability, metabolism, and toxic and therapeutic levels of a variety of medications.

PASC 601K Pre-Clinical Basic Sciences (3 Units)

This course provides students with a review of core cell biology concepts related to the study of medicine and introduces students to medical pathology, genetics, and immunology in preparation for the system-based courses beginning in semester II. Students are also introduced to the basic principles of pharmacology (pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, autonomic principles), as well as the mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, side effects, bioavailability, metabolism, and toxic and therapeutic levels of a variety of medications in preparation for future courses.

PASC 700A Topics in PA Practice I (3 Units)

This is the first course in a two-part series. The course focuses on understanding the philosophical and practical principles related to the following topics: professional and medical ethics, patient/provider and provider/provider relationships, HIPAA, confidentiality, history of and current topics in the PA profession and professional practice, provider burnout. Additionally, the course discusses providing care for under-resourced, vulnerable, and diverse patient populations, including those from underserved communities and populations. Cultural considerations and cognitive bias in patient care, health disparities, and the PA as a health educator are emphasized. Students will complete the CDC-recognized Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), becoming certified lifestyle coaches, as well as Safe Zone training, learning about LGBTQ+ identities, gender and sexuality, and examine prejudice, assumptions, and privilege.

PASC 701 Introduction to Clinical Anatomy (1.5 Units)

This course familiarizes the student with clinically relevant anatomy of the human body with a focus on structural and functional relationships. Lab and lecture format with the laboratory portion including cadaver dissection and diagnostic imaging, focusing on spatial relationships, normal structure and normal variant structures, the relationships of organs and organ systems. There are clinical correlations and consideration of gross pathology.

PASC 702 Introduction to Pediatrics (1.5 Units)

This course introduces the student to the well-care of children from birth through adolescence. It focuses on the pediatric history and physical examination, well child visits and associated screenings, and developmental milestones. Pediatric dosing and prescription writing are also discussed.

PASC 703A Clinical Integration I (1.5 Units)

This course introduces the student to clinical diagnostic studies including Point of Care Ultrasound and radiology, sensitivity and specificity, medical terminology, history taking, screening physical examination, and the role of the primary care provider.

PBHC 604 Health Policy and Management (3 Units)

This is a lecture-based course with interactive discussion sections, intended to introduce students to the policy-making process in the health sector and to give them an overview of the organization, management and financing of the US health system. We discuss the accessibility, cost, and quality of health care. The health care system in the community and its environment are examined to determine how they impact Health Services Administration.

PBHC 607 Biostatistics (3 Units)

This course provides students with statistical concepts and methods for analyzing continuous and categorical data, with an emphasis on learning analytical methods through hands-on experience with real data. Public health applications of descriptive statistics, basic probability concepts, one and two sample statistical inference, analysis of variance and simple linear regression are discussed. Students are introduced to a statistical computer package such as SPSS.

PBHC 608 Behavioral and Social Aspects of Public Health (3 Units)

This course provides students with an introduction to behavioral and social science theory in the context of public research and practice. This course exposes students to a broad range of theories and frameworks commonly employed in the public health arena, and applicable to other health professions as well (e.g., medicine, nursing, social work). Theories of health behavior help researchers, practitioners and participants (patients, community members) identify targets and opportunities for change as well as methods for accomplishing change. These theories are discussed using examples of their applications to numerous public health problems including, but not limited to, HIV/AIDS, material and child health, violence, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and global health. In addition, this course emphasizes developing strong scientific literacy and skills to interpret empirical evidence in the context of research methods.

PBHC 631 Social Justice Lecture Series (0 Units)

This course is a 6-part lecture series which includes individual and panel presentations from experts in the field of public health and social justice. Each 2-hour session will include a lecture or panel presentation followed by a question and answer period.

PBHC 648 Environmental Health (3 Units)

This course explores the challenges our population faces from health risks from environmental hazards, and our role in their creation and exacerbation. Students will explore the meaning of environmental health and the wealth of human health threats posed through factors in air, food, water, climate, and the built environment. The class will provide an overview of the main tools used in the field of environmental health to understand, quantify, and minimize these health risks. Case studies from domestic and international examples will be used to illustrate variations in risk with differences in exposure pathway, mode of action, susceptibility, and regulation. Close attention will be paid to exposure distribution as it relates to social inequity and injustice. Students will examine their own role in the globalized economy of today, and look for opportunities to improve on the future prognosis of environmental health.

Semester II - Spring

PASC 703B Clinical Integration II (.5 Units)

This course will allow students to expand and build upon the skills and knowledge obtained in Clinical Integration I and each of the system-based courses for the term, focusing on clinical problem-solving and effective communication, ordering and interpreting diagnostic studies, as well as assessment and management of commonly encountered disorders in primary care. Public health considerations will be discussed.

PASC 704R Renal System (2 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the renal system.

PASC 704E Endocrine System (2.5 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the endocrine system. The course will also include an interprofessional diabetes curriculum.

PASC 704H Hematology and Oncology System (2 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse popculations across the life span for conditions within the hematology and oncology system.

PASC 704C Cardiovascular System (5 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the cardiovascular system.

PASC 704T EENT System (2.5 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the EENT system.

PASC 705A Medical Spanish for Health Professionals I (Elective) (.5 Units)

The first course in the series will primarily focus on gathering a history and performing a physical examination. Pediatric considerations will be discussed. Case-based coursework will be sequenced with the corresponding PA curriculum.

PBHC 618 Epidemiology 45 (3 Units)

This course introduces the basic principles and methods of epidemiology and demonstrates its applicability in the field of public health. Topics to be covered include the historical perspective of epidemiology, ethics in epidemiology, measures of disease occurrence and association, study design, screening for disease in a population, causal inference, error, bias, and confounding. Students will learn to evaluate and interpret epidemiological literature.

PBHC 619 Research Methods 15 (1.5 Units)

This is a course in interdisciplinary research methodologies widely used in the social sciences and public health prevention studies and introduces social theory, conducting a literature review, framing research questions, research design, data collection and/or conducting fieldwork, and analyzing or interpreting research findings for presentation in a report or thesis. The course will address mixed methods, and qualitative data collection and analytical techniques. Students will learn how to identify an area of interest, formulate research questions, conduct a research method, and identify the appropriate data collection and analysis strategy.


Public Health Courses, Choose One (3 Units)

PBHC 614 Essentials of Global Health (3 Units)

This course introduces students to the field of global public health with an emphasis on the developing world. The course orients students to the skills necessary for understanding patterns and illness in resource-poor countries. It explores the continuum between health and sickness in populations around the world and emphasizes the influence of both global and domestic factors in contributing to variation in health. Students are introduced to the major health problems currently impacting the developing world and alerted to the importance of a global approach to solving these health problems. Additionally, they will be introduced to the major players in international health: the donor communities, Ministries of Health, and UN agencies.

PBHC 620 Social Inequities in Health (3 Units)

This course will examine the contextual factors of primary health care and health disparities within the US. Current trends will be described and discussed utilizing case study methodology to examine health indicators among the US population. Students will gain an increased understanding of the impact of current trends such as increased negative health outcomes among minority and underserved populations. Students will have an increased understanding of the complexities associated with addressing health disparities in the United States. Issues of community-organizing, community partnerships, empowerment, and community participation and their relevance in public health strategies, interventions, and policymaking efforts that address health disparities will also be examined.

PBHC 633 Criminal Justice and Public Health (3 Units)

This course will provide students with an overview of the intersection between the criminal justice system and public health. Students will gain an understanding of how U.S. mass incarceration is a public health issue. Topics will include the history and philosophy of incarceration, criminal justice and policy, health issues in prisons, women and incarceration, reintegration after incarceration, the impacts of incarceration on families and communities, prevention, restorative justice, juvenile justice, disability justice, as well as institutional racism, police violence, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of incarceration.

Semester III - Summer

PASC 703C Clinical Integration III (.5 Unit)

This course will allow students to expand and build upon the skills and knowledge obtained in Clinical Integration I-II and each of the system-based courses covered in this and previous terms, focusing on clinical problem-solving and effective communication, ordering and interpreting diagnostic studies, as well as assessment and management of commonly encountered disorders in primary care. Public health considerations will be discussed.

PASC 704B Psychiatry and Behavioral Health System (4 Unit)

This course builds on Pharmacology I. It is sequenced with Medicine II so that PA students will gain a greater understanding regarding the management of the disease states and conditions presented in the Medicine II, Psychiatry, and MCH I course, including pharmacologic considerations when treating culturally, economically and racially diverse populations.

PASC 704P Pulmonary System (3.5 Unit)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the pulmonary system.

PASC 705B Medical Spanish for Health Professionals II (Elective) (.5 Units)

The second course in the series will expand on the skills of gathering a history and performing a physical examination. Case-based coursework will be sequenced with the corresponding PA curriculum.


Public Health Courses, Choose One (3 Units)

PBHC 602 Emerging Health Threats (3 Units)

Emerging bacterial, protozoal, and viral diseases represent an increasing threat to human health. This course aims to examine the impact of emerging and re-emerging disease agents which affect public health in the United States and worldwide. More specifically, this course will explore the challenges and strategies public health professionals will face in the diagnosis, prevention, control and surveillance of emerging health threats. This course will highlight the role of person, time and place in specific emerging health threats such as Malaria, Ebola, West Nile Virus, Influenza, MRSA, and Tuberculosis among many others.

PBHC 606 Community Health Promotion (3 Units)

This course is designed to provide an introductory understanding of the basic concepts, skills, models and resources currently utilized in the field of health education and promotion. The course will assist health care providers and public health professionals to holistically approach their work and acquire the essential tools to deliver information and strategies to improve health with a focus on underserved populations. Through lectures, weekly readings, assignments, in-class discussions/presentations, guest lectures from local public health experts and Community Health Promotion Work Practice, students will explore various approaches to community-based health promotion. We will explore how these approaches connect efforts to promote social justice and to end health disparities.

PBHC 634 Criminal Justice Law and Public Health Advocacy (3 units)

This course will provide students with a foundation in constitutional law and civic education while focusing on a wide range of important issues in public health law, regulations, and the factors at play when developing advocacy strategies on issues that intersect public health and the criminal justice system. Students will gain an understanding of seminal and precedent-setting public health law cases that have led to policy reform in incarceration, prevention, correctional health, and reentry health.

Semester IV - Fall

PASC 703D Clinical Integration IV (.5 Units)

This course will allow students to expand and build upon the skills and knowledge obtained in Clinical Integration I-III and each of the system-based courses covered in this and previous terms, focusing on clinical problem-solving and effective communication, ordering and interpreting diagnostic studies, as well as assessment and management of commonly encountered disorders in primary care. Public health considerations will be discussed.

PASC 704G Gastrointestinal System (4.5 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the gastrointestinal system.

PASC 704S Sexual Health and Reproductive System (4.5 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating a culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the sexual health and reproductive system. Focusing on the obstetric patient, this course will also cover the progression of pregnancy from conception to birth.

PASC 704U Genitourinary System (1.5 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the genitourinary system.

PASC 704M Musculoskeletal System (4 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the musculoskeletal system.

PASC 704N Neurologic System (4 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the neurologic system.

PASC 704D Dermatologic System (2.5 Units)

This course will cover the epidemiology, public health considerations including social determinants of health, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment approaches, and patient education for treating culturally, economically, racially, sexually, and gender diverse populations across the life span for conditions within the dermatologic system.

PASC 705C Medical Spanish for Health Professionals III (Elective) (.5 Units)

The third course in the series will continue to expand on the skills of gathering a history and performing a physical examination. Case-based coursework will be sequenced with the corresponding PA curriculum.

PBHC 647 Program Evaluation and Needs Assessment (3 Units)

This course serves as an introduction to evaluation methodology and evaluation tools commonly used to assess programs. Students will become familiar with the concepts, methods, and applications of program evaluation and will be able to propose an appropriate evaluation plan to assess the implementation and effectiveness of a program. This course also explores community health needs assessment methods. Emphasis is placed on methods for ensuring data integrity by exploring data collection, maintenance and dissemination. Instructional techniques will include traditional lectures to highlight course readings and provide practical examples of “real life” program evaluation experiences. Students will also regularly work in small groups to reinforce course concepts from readings and lectures.

Semester V - Spring

PASC 703E Clinical Applications V (1.5 Units)

This is the 5th and final component of the 5-part series that will review material learned from all of the system-based courses with a focus on application to the pediatric and geriatric populations. This course also includes transitional topics appropriate for PA students entering clinical rotations including billing and coding, consults and referrals, managing multiple patients, and grand rounds. Public health considerations will be discussed.

PASC 706 Emergency and Surgical Principles (3 Units)

This course will present the basics of surgical principles as well as the proper and acceptable techniques for performing the common clinical skills necessary for a PA in an emergency room, operating room, and primary care setting. This course will use simulation activities to provide the PA student with an overview of common life-threatening or urgent medical conditions seen in the Emergency Department or Urgent Care Center. This includes the prompt recognition and triage of life-threatening conditions and their immediate management and/or stabilization and trauma management. It builds upon and fosters integration of information from previous courses, stressing the presentation and management of common problems in an emergent setting.

PASC 700B Topics in PA Practice II (1 Unit)

This course assists students with the transition from the didactic to clinical year. Additionally, it is designed to lay the groundwork for a successful clinical year. This course will include instruction in the rules and regulations of the clinical year, California laws and regulations surrounding PA practice and student role, preceptor/student relationships, roles and expectations, legal aspects of healthcare, feedback formats, Joint Commission patient safety guidelines, professionalism, time management, and study techniques on clinical rotations.

PBHC 646 *CPH Exam Preparation (0 Units)

Students who enroll in PBHC 646 are required to take the Certified in Public Health (CPH) exam sponsored by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Students register for the 1-unit TUC course PBHC 646 CPH Exam Preparation and also register with the National Board of Public Health Examiners (www.nbphe.org) for the Certified in Public Health (CPH) exam. Students must register for PBHC 646 in the same semester in which they take the CPH exam - following the completion of core and concentration courses. Students must pass the CPH exam to pass PH 646. The Certified in Public Health (CPH) exam covers the core areas of knowledge offered in CEPH-accredited schools and programs, as well as crosscutting areas relevant to contemporary public health. The examination was crafted to assess a person’s knowledge of these competencies, regardless of his or her academic concentration.

Clinical Year Rotations (Semesters VI-VIII)

You must complete all rotations listed below, but the order in which you complete them may be different than how it is outlined below. Assignment of rotations is the responsibility of the Director of Clinical Education, Clinical Coordinator, and the PA/MPH Program. You are not required to develop or arrange your own clinical sites. You will have the opportunity to request rotation assignments and recommend potential preceptor sites through the Student Preceptor/Rotation Request Form.

PASC 606 Primary Care 1 (6 Units)

Required rotation where PA students will be placed in an outpatient and/or inpatient setting, with a provider practicing in family medicine and/or internal medicine to obtain exposure to the principles of these primary care specialties. This may include experience with patients across the life span seeking care for preventive, emergent, acute, and/or chronic conditions and may include gynecological or obstetrical care as well as mental health conditions.

PASC 607 Primary Care 2 (6 Units)

Required rotation where PA students will be placed in an outpatient and/or inpatient setting, with a provider practicing in family medicine and/or internal medicine to obtain exposure to the principles of these primary care specialties. This may include experience with patients across the life span seeking care for preventive, emergent, acute, and/or chronic conditions and may include gynecological or obstetrical care as well as mental health conditions.

PASC 608 Primary Care 3 (6 Units)

Required rotation where PA students will be placed in an out- patient and/or inpatient setting, with a provider practicing in family medicine, internal medicine and/or behavioral and mental health, to provide experience with geriatric patients and/or those patients seeking care for behavioral and mental health conditions.

PASC 609 Primary Care 4 (6 Units)

Required rotation where PA students will be placed in an outpatient and/or inpatient setting, with a provider practicing in family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and/or pediatrics to obtain experience in these primary care specialty areas. This includes experience with patients seeking care for pediatric, obstetrical, and/or gynecological conditions.

PASC 610 Surgery (6 Units)

Required rotation where PA students will be placed in a surgery rotation to obtain experience with patients seeking care for conditions requiring surgical management, including pre-operative, intra-operative, and postoperative care.

PASC 611 Emergency Medicine (6 Units)

Required rotation where PA students will be placed in a hospital-based emergency room to provide experience with patients seeking care for acute and emergent issues.

PASC 612 Elective 1 (6 Units)

PA students in good academic standing will be given the opportunity to complete a rotation in a specialty of their choice.

PASC 613 Elective 2 (6 Units)

PA students in good academic standing will be given the opportunity to complete a rotation in a specialty of their choice.

PASC 614 MSPAS Summative Course (3 Units)

This course is designed to provide the student with a review of the PA Program curriculum to prepare them to enter clinical practice as well as education related to PA practice issues. It allows a summative assessment of the student’s readiness to graduate and enter clinical practice.

PBHC 600-4 Public Health Field Study (4 Units)

The Public Health Field Study course is a structured and practical experience in a professional public health setting which allows students to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired during the didactic period into public health practice. Joint and Dual degree students are required to complete 200 hours for PBHC-4 during a 6-week block. There are three concentrations available: Community Health, Global Health, and Health Equity and Criminal Justice. Through the Field Study, students apply their academic knowledge to “real world” situations that address public health issues. Students conduct field work as interns at public health organizations, which serve as field study placement sites. The role of the MPH student intern is to assist partnering organizations with specific public health projects, locally and abroad. Student participation should contribute to strategic resolutions, be valued by the Organization, and contribute to meeting its mission and goals. Through their field work, students help to build and strengthen working partnerships between field study placement sites and TUC.

PBHC 645 *MPH Capstone Project (0 Units)

Students conducting a Capstone project produce a substantial, original, independently written manuscript concerning a significant public health problem and share and defend their work during an oral presentation. The goal of the Capstone project should be to create a body of knowledge on which others can build. However, the overarching principle for determining suitability of a Capstone project is whether it provides students the opportunity to apply the skills and competencies acquired in the MPH program to a problem likely to be encountered in public health practice. All Capstone projects will be conducted under the guidance of a faculty advisor, secondary faculty advisor, and the course coordinator.

*Students will take either PBHC 646 in Semester V or PBHC 645 in Semester VIII.

Total Program Credit Hours 142.5 (excludes Medical Spanish Elective & Additional Electives).

Additional Electives

These additional courses are available for students as part of their full time tuition.

Global Wellness (Fall & Spring) IPEC 692

This course unites the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, integrative medicine (including Ayurveda, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Functional Medicine, and Lifestyle Medicine), and behavioral change science. Its aim is to educate individuals about effective techniques of wellness and personal resilience. This course includes various activities such as video presentations, building healthy habits, and engaging in group and peer coach check-ins to evaluate personal progress.

Pathways to Success (Fall & Spring) IPEC 690

This pass/no pass course offers students the opportunity to learn and apply evidence-based study techniques, test-taking strategies, mindfulness, and time management skills. The course will address well-being maintenance and coping strategies to navigate stressful life experiences. This interactive and self-reflective course consists of six sessions throughout the semester. Students will need to complete two self-care reflections and two surveys.

Pediatric Obesity Prevention Program (Fall & Spring) Part A: OPCC 671A - Part B: OPCC 671B

The Community Health: Pediatric Obesity Prevention Program, also known as The Project HAPPY (Healthy Attitudes Produce Positive Youth), elective offers students the opportunity to engage with the pediatric community. Through patient education and behavioral modification, the program aims to establish healthy habits and reduce the rate of pediatric obesity. This elective consists of two parts, allowing students the opportunity to provide counseling to families, employ practice-based learning, and participate in an ongoing research project.

Part A of Project HAPPY focuses on training students to lead a research program centered on behavioral modification that is currently underway in Vallejo, CA. Participating Vallejo families are paired with a Touro student health navigator who delivers a predetermined curriculum focusing on attitudes toward health and wellness. Upon completion of Part A, students will be eligible to enroll in Part B of Project HAPPY, in which students will partner with a family to guide them through the Project HAPPY curriculum. Please note that completion of Part A is a prerequisite for enrollment in Part B of Project HAPPY Elective.

Taboo: A Study of Medical Bias (Spring) OPCC 665

This course introduces students to the concept of healthcare inequalities related to implicit bias and explores six common biases in healthcare: gender, obesity, race, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and drug misuse. The topics will be explored through peer teaching, articles, video presentations, reflective writing, and class discussions.

Science-based Reproductive Health Care IPEC 654

This discussion-based course addresses the physiology, pharmacology, demographics, social policy, and clinical aspects of reproductive health care with an emphasis on abortion, infertility, and transgender care. The purpose of this course is to equip students with an in-depth knowledge base on these topics, expanding beyond what is covered in their core curricula. This course encourages interprofessional education and discussion. Through readings and class discussion, students will analyze the science-based aspects and terminology of reproductive and gender-affirming care. This 1-unit course meets for 1.5 hours a week for 10 weeks. Currently, a maximum of 25 students may enroll.

LGBTQIA+ Considerations in Healthcare (Fall & Spring) IPEC 650

This course serves as an introduction for aspiring healthcare professionals who wish to become allies to the LGBTQIA+ community, as well as other marginalized and underrepresented groups. This course provides students with the opportunity to understand how their values shape their professional lives and influence their interactions with diverse patient cultures. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the course explores the experiences of both LGBTQIA+ patients and providers, with a focus on clinically relevant topics. Topics include trauma-informed care, pediatric patient care, LGBTQIA+ aging, transgender affirming healthcare, reproductive health, fertility primary care in the LGBTQIA+ community, and clinical scenarios involving LGBTQIA+-related issues from an intersectional perspective. This elective includes Implicit Bias Training and SafeZone training to equip students with communication tools to provide appropriate care with communities that differ from their own.

Interprofessional Elective in Street Medicine (Spring) IPEC 653

This course offers students the opportunity to gain insight into the healthcare needs of the unhoused population, particularly in Vallejo, CA. This course aims to enhance empathetic encounters with patients, addressing the mind, body, and spirit within each individual. It covers various topics such as substance abuse, chronic illness, wound care, and health insurance. A final reflection assignment will be completed, after fulfilling other course requirements such as case discussions and volunteering. This 15 hour elective course involves pre-recorded sessions, interprofessional group work, and hands-on experience working with the unhoused community in Vallejo.